Max Brzezicki
PRESIDENT of the SOCIETY


BMedSc (1st Hons) FNS

Max Brzezicki
Max Brzezicki

BMedSc (1st Hons) FNS

Passionate about evidence-based medicine and science, likes slicing meat, crushing rat brains, criminal & public law, foreign languages, rhetoric, history, classical studies and political thought. FNS since 2015.


Advisory boards

Board of trustees
ICT in Neurosciences
Neuropharmacology and NDE


RECENT PUBLICATIONS

The Solaris of Artificial Intelligence in Research – Part 2

People often ask me about the most breathtaking thing about the AI’s behaviour. Well, first of all, I was, quite frankly, amazed that it had worked at all.

Having such a scarce instrumentarium, I wasn’t sure if I could emulate an environment that could facilitate the conversation and to bring any meaningful values back.

But when the first shock of it working worn off, I was baffled by the variety of different suggestions proposed by the algorithm.

There are people cleverer than me who can set up a complex processing software that will check for a given hypothesis. But I wanted for the AI to come up with a completely novel hypothesis and to test it out. In fact, I wanted it to come up with a number of new ideas, concepts and suggestions and to test them all out in turn, so that, at the end of the day, I could browse through these that work on paper and judge their clinical feasibility.

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The Solaris of Artificial Intelligence in Clinical Research

The modern world collects an obscenely humongous amount of information about humans, their interactions, patterns of behaviour, health states and service use. Connected to super-cluster servers and cloud storages are endless streams of data coming from our phones, watches, cameras, fridges and toasters, most of which we submit voluntarily, with varying degree of awareness of what happens to them later on.

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The loss is in the eye of the beholder

RECENT ADVANCES IN RESTORATION OF SIGHT

 

John Freke, the first ophthalmic surgeon in Britain started practising at St Bart’s around the time when the Bristol Royal Infirmary opened its doors, but it was not until Baron de Wenzel’s appointment in 1772 that the specialty gained its true recognition. After becoming an oculist to King George III, de Wenzel perfected his skill in removing the cataracts, which was seen at a time as an almost miraculous deed of evangelical magnitude (1).

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21 grams that destroyed the universe.

MY LORD I have learned with the greatest regret today that our honorary fellow, Prof Jerzy Vetulani has unfortunately passed away, shortly after 9 pm Oxford time on Thursday. I am sure that the whole House would like to join me in sharing the condolences with the family of Prof Vetulani on this very sad day.

 

Prof Vetulani was a true hero of our times: bravely defending the basic sciences of neurology and psychology, engaging with the public and inspiring generations of young doctors and scientists.

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[BOOK REVIEW] Retrieval Medicine – a career that isn’t on the menu

I have had an immense pleasure of reading the Oxford Handbook of Retrieval Medicine. It was an enjoyable, satisfying and, above all, adventurous journey, and I’d like to share a couple of my reflections.

Before I dive into the exciting world of retrieval medicine, I must admit that I had little knowledge of the field before reading the book, and only after digesting a solid portion of the publication did I realise how ignorant I had been.

Nonetheless, I would bet my kingdom, and a horse, that many of you have little to no idea what retrieval medicine actually is. And this is exactly why you should read the book.

It will certainly blow your mind, inspire you and make you feel grateful for the truly Benedictine effort that went into preparing this unique handbook.

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Managing the Uncertainty: Introduction to Evidence Based Medicine PART 3

Is Hypnotherapy Effective and Why Charcot Was Wrong About Hysteria?

It was a remarkable symposium of neurological masterminds of the time: Jean-Martin Charcot, accompanied by Joseph Babinski, Pierre Marie, Georges Gilles de la Tourette, and other discoverers of famous neurological disorders were observing a truly bizarre spectacle.

Gentlemen,’ began the Napoléon of neuroses, ‘You may know that I initially believed hysteria to be a neurological disorder, which can be an inherited flaw of the nervous systems.

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The pump on Broad Street: Introduction to Evidence Based Medicine PART1

introtoev

 

It was another shivering-cold, windy day of autumn 1971.

The hospital room, mystically disguised in cigarette smoke, was full of busy consultants, chest x-rays and illegible scribbles of patients notes from yesterday’s ward rounds, pinned together in clumsy folders. Lively discussion sharply ceased when dr Archie Cochrane entered the room, carrying, to the dismay of his colleagues, another file of tables and figures. His randomised controlled trial of patients treated at Coronary Cardiac Units vs patients released home showed a slight numerical advantage for those who had been discharged.

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The War On Drugs Is Lost And We Should Finally Face It – PROSECUTION

MY LORD –

On 18th June 1971, Richard Nixon, the president of the United States declared the War on Drugs. Today, the US alone spends $51bilion every year on that endeavour, with over a quarter of a million dollars already spent since I started my summation. In summer 2016, we will be reaching almost 50 years of that war, and there is still no victory on the horizon.

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